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12th Street  *  8th and 9th Street  *  East Street

 


12th Street Historic District


A sampling of houses from the 12h Street Historic District

Golden takes pride in being a “walkable” community, and in recent years we’ve made a number of improvements to ensure that people can easily walk from the residential neighborhoods to the historic downtown. This is a goal that many new, planned communities are striving to include from the very beginning.

The idea of living within walking distance to work is anything but new. Golden’s historic neighborhoods are full of houses that were built or occupied by downtown business owners, and nowhere is that more true than in our 12th Street Historic District. Some of the notable commuters are mentioned in this section.


12th Street Historic District

1    900 12th      1873
     M.I. Morrill, the manager of the Golden Illuminating Company, lived here for many years.

2    906 12th      1879
     James Gow, who lived in this house (Pansy’s Parlor Bed & Breakfast) built several buildings around Golden, including the
     Armory—the big cobblestone building at 13th and Arapahoe.

3    920 12th      1879
     The Kelly mansion, at 920 12th Street, was built for Dr. James Kelly. The doctor practiced from an office in his house. He also
     owned a drugstore at 1101 Washington Avenue. The current residents own the Golden City Brewery, which operates out of the
     carriage house in the backyard

4    1000 12th      1901
     John Collum built this house and ran the Malachite Smelter, which operated on the bank of Clear Creek.

5    1006 12th      1903
     Franklin Hills, who worked for the Colorado School of Mines, lived in this house.

6    1010 12th      1897
     Soren Sorenson built this house. He owned a grocery store on Washington Avenue.

7    1014 12th      1893
     Simon Parshall built this house. He worked for the Colorado Central Railroad, which was based here in Golden. He later worked
     for a grocery store at 10th and Washington.

8    1018 12th      1872
     George West, the founder and long-time owner of the Golden Transcript, was the first owner of this house. The Transcript was
     located in the same building as Dr. Kelly’s drugstore, at 1101 Washington Avenue.

9    1022 12th      1903

10  1114 Illinois      1904

11   1107 11th      1869

12   1109 11th      1866
     The owner of this house came to Golden in a covered wagon. He ran a local saloon.

13   1119 11th     
     Elmer Bengsen, the first owner of this house, was a local carpenter.

14   1112-1200 12th      1872

15   1123 12th      1876
     George Kimball, the owner of this house, was the Golden Postmaster and City Clerk.

16   1114 12th      1871
     John Titus, the owner of 1114 12th Street, ran a dry goods store on Washington Avenue.

17   1111 12th      1874

18   1106 12th      1873
     One of the owners of this house owned a livery barn and was the town sheriff.

19   1105 12th      1874
     Charles Welch, who built this house, was an influential early citizen. He sold the land to Adolph Coors where much of the
     brewery now stands.

20   1210 Illinois      1902
      George West (the Golden Transcript owner) spent his later years in this house.

21   1100 13th      1924
     Fred Robinson owned a bookstore on Washington Avenue. He built the house at 1100 13th Street and lived there for 35 years.

22   1220 Cheyenne      1874
     This house was built for a local blacksmith and was later occupied by a Mines professor.

23   1211 Cheyenne      1890

 
 


8th and 9th Street Historic District


A sampling of houses from the 8th & 9th Street Historic District

Historically, Golden had a distinct rift between “Northsiders” (people who lived on the north side of Clear Creek) and “Southsiders” (those who lived on the south side).

The commercial downtown and the School of Mines were located on the south side of the Creek. The north side attracted more industry, including mills, a coal mine, a paper mill, several smelters, brickworks, and the railroad tracks.

So while the 12th Street Historic District was built by business owners and professors, the 8th and 9th Street District traditionally housed those who worked in Golden’s industries. According to “Southsiders,” the tough kids lived on the north side of town!

These days, the residents tend to be young professionals who revel in their small, exquisitely-restored historic homes, many of which were built in the 1870s and 1880s. Starting at Lions Park, stroll east along 9th Street, and enjoy beautifully preserved examples of the smaller houses where 19th century workers lived.

One building still stands from the neighborhood’s industrial past: The Rock Flour Mill building at 8th and Cheyenne. This is one of two remaining flour mill buildings in town. The other is the Golden Mill, now a feed store, which is on Ford Street on Clear Creek.


8th & 9th Street Historic District

1. 1217 9th Street c.1890
2. 1200 9th Street 1885
3. 1195 9th Street c.1882
4. 1185 9th Street c.1882
5. 1170 9th Street c.1878
6. 1205 9th Street c.1906
7. 1160 9th Street c.1910
8. 1203 9th Street 1873
9. 1150 9th Street 1875
10. 1140 9th Street c.1871
11. 1145 9th Street c.1882
12. 1135 9th Street c.1878
13. 1130 9th Street c.1882
14. 1120 9th Street 1873
15. 1109 9th Street 1945
16. 1110 9th Street c.1882
17. 1105 9th Street 1937
18. 1101 9th Street 1941
19. 1100 9th Street c.1882
20. 912 Illinois Street 1873
21. 923 Illinois Street
22. 1027 9th Street 1874
23. 1013 9th Street c.1876
24. 1005 9th Street 1910
25. 921 9th Street 1870
26. 920 9th Street c.1878
27. 915 9th Street c.1863
28. 916 9th Street c.1863
29. 911 9th Street c.1886
30. 908 9th Street 1875
31. 911-1/2 9th Street 1926
32. 906 9th Street c.1895
33. 900 Arapahoe St. 1924
34. 900 9th Street 1924
35. 823 9th Street 1882
36. 815 9th Street 1879
37. 818 9th Street 1904
38. 812 9th Street c.1916
39. 807 9th Street 1873
40. 817 Arapahoe St. 1938
41. 811 Arapahoe St. c.1900
42. 808 Arapahoe St. 1867
43. 802 Arapahoe St. c.1871
44. 917 8th Street 1881
45. 807 Arapahoe St. c.1906
46. 904 Arapahoe St. 1921
47. 910 Arapahoe St. 1941
48. 911 Arapahoe St. c. 1882
49. 913 Arapahoe St. c. 1873
50. 912 Arapahoe St . 1868
51. 920 10th Street 1867
52. 918 10th Street c.1880
53. 914 10th Street c.1938
54. 900 10th Street 1878
55. 822 10th Street 1873
56. 816 10th Street c.1900
57. 810 10th Street c.1900

 


East Street Historic District


A sampling of houses from the East Street Historic District

The East Street neighborhood, built on the slopes of South Table Mountain, provides a nice timeline of architectural styles. The oldest houses are those at the north end of the neighborhood, closest to downtown. A few blocks south, the styles of the 1920s and 1930s are represented. Post-World War II ranches dominate the south end of the neighborhood.

Historically, East and Ford Streets were major entryways into Golden. The commuter trolley from Denver also travelled this route on its way to downtown Golden. Remnants of a more-commercial past can be seen in the south end of the neighborhood. Two historic motels (at 24th and Ford and 24th and Jackson) have now been adapted for use as offices and apartments. The site of a long-ago motor-campground is being converted into condominiums.

     


East Street Historic District
 

1 515 14th St. c1882
2 509 14th St. c1882
3 507 14th St. 1879
4 501 14th St. 1873
5 1409 East St. 1867
6 1415 East St. c1873
7 1427 East St. c1919
8 1431 East St. 1942
9 500 15th St. 1873
10 506 15th St. c1906
11 509 15th St. 1890s
12 515 15th St. c1906
13 520 15th St. c1906
14 528 15th St. 1911
15 1415 Ford St. c.1878
16 1418 Ford St. 1872
17 1419 Ford St. c1878
18 1423 Ford St. 1873
19 1425 Ford St. c1900
20 1422 Ford St. 1872
21 1505 Ford St. c1905
22 1509 Ford St. 1867
23 1515 Ford St. c1939
24 1519 Ford St. c1878
25 1523 Ford St. 1889
26 512 16th St. 1929
27 511 16th St. c1873
28 510 16th St. 1939
29 507 16th St. c1906
30 500 16th St. 1940
31 503 16th St. c1873
32 1501 East St. c1911
33 1505 East St. 1915
34 1509 East St. 1909
35 1515 East St. c1906
36 1519 East St. 1927
37 1521 East St. 1945
38 1615 East St. 1925
39 1623 East St. 1925
40 510 17th St. 1919
41 501 17th St. 1945
42 511 17th St. 1920
43 515 17th St. 1889
44 1607 Ford St. c1878
45 1609 Ford St. 1879
46 1615 Ford St. c1873
47 1619 Ford St. c1878
48 1623 Ford St. c1919
49 1703 Ford St. c1928
50 1707 Ford St. Pre-1878
51 1709 Ford St. 1901
52 1715 Ford St. c1915
53 1719 Ford St. 1903
54 500 18th St. 1892
55 1701 East St. c1932
56 1709 East St. 1935
57 1801 East St. 1940
58 1805 East St. c1938
59 1815 East St. c1944
60 501 18th St. c1922
61 503 18th St. 1924
62 509 18th St. 1873
63 519 18th St. 1900
64 1801 Ford St. 1873
65 1800 Ford St. 1874
66 1807 Ford St. c1926
67 1804 Ford St. 1906
68 1809 Ford St. c1927
69 1810 Ford St. c1878
70 1812 Ford St. 1927
72 500 19th St. 1901



Contributing Editor:  Richard Gardner, Gardner History and Preservation, www.gardnerhistory.com

Source:
Golden Old and New – a walking tour guide. Cathleen Norman, 1996.

 

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